2014-05-09 / Sports Spotlight

Red Storm standout to play junior hockey

By Michael Kelley Staff Writer


Scarborough High School senior Cam Loiselle will get his first taste of post-high school hockey in August when he reports to the Walpole Express training camp. Walpole Express is a member of the Eastern Hockey League, a league devoted to readying players for collegiate and professional play. (Courtesy photo by Tammy Belanger Photography) Scarborough High School senior Cam Loiselle will get his first taste of post-high school hockey in August when he reports to the Walpole Express training camp. Walpole Express is a member of the Eastern Hockey League, a league devoted to readying players for collegiate and professional play. (Courtesy photo by Tammy Belanger Photography) Scarborough High School senior Cam Loiselle has been playing hockey ever since he can remember and, after graduation in June, is ready to take his game to the next level.

On Aug. 15, Losielle will be heading to Massachusetts training camp for the Walpole Express, a junior hockey team in the Eastern Hockey League.

“My dad had a street hockey stick he cut up for me when I was 2. I learned to skate at 3. That’s when I really got into the game. I learned to play at 5, so I have really grown up with the sport,” said Loiselle, 17.

“As long as I can remember I have loved hockey. When you are good at something, you like to do it as much as you can. When I play hockey, it is unlike anything else,” added Loiselle, who is hoping to help the boys’ lacrosse team earn its fifth state championship in as many years this spring.

The Eastern Hockey League was established in 2003 to develop student-athletes who aspire to play collegiate or professional hockey. The league is made up of 18 teams located in New England, New York and Pennsylvania. The Walpole Express finished the season winning 13 of 44 regular season games.

The jump between high school hockey and collegiate hockey can be steep, said Norm Gagne, Scarborough High School boys’ hockey coach. However, Gagne feels Loiselle, a defensemen, has what it takes to succeed at the college level.

“I told him he has to work this summer to get stronger. If he can do that, he has all the talent to make it to the next level. He is a smart young man. He’s got good hockey sense and is a great student of the game,” Gagne said.

Loiselle said he decided if he wanted to play collegiate hockey, he needed a year to further refine his hockey skills.

“To play in college, you almost have to take a post-grad year. You don’t see many players jump from high school to college. I knew I had to take a post-grad year or play juniors. I talked to my coaches and we decided juniors would be the best choice for me,” Loiselle said.

Gagne said much of the success the team had on the ice this season can be attributed to Loiselle, as well as fellow captains Cam Brochu and Jake Gross.

“Our senior leadership was terrific. To have a young team like we had, you really need good leadership,” Gagne said. “These young men were a great group of leaders. They took the younger players under their wing and built their confidence.”

Gagne said it was fun seeing Loiselle improve his game every season. This season Loiselle, who scored 14 goals and 17 assists in 18 games, switched back to defense after playing offense his sophomore and junior years.

“I watched Cam get better and better each year,” Gagne said. “He’s a kid that’s hard working and loves the game and is a true competitor. He knows how to compete.”

Loiselle was a semifinalist for the Travis Roy Award, an annual award handed out to the best senior hockey player in Class A.

“He was a dominant player. I felt he should have been a finalist for the Travis Roy Award. Everyone who saw him play knows he had the skills,” Gagne said.

Loiselle, who heard about the Eastern Hockey League from former Thornton Academy hockey player Bryan Dallaire, said his goal during the one-year Walpole Express contract is to continue improving his game. He will get ample time to do so. The season, he said, is made up of 10 preseason games, close to 50 regular season games, as well as four special showcases during the year. After that, Loiselle will be looking to play college hockey and possibly study business.

“Hockey is a big deal, but I am not going to go to a college I don’t like just to play hockey,” Loiselle said.

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